The Homeric Attributes of Agamemnon in Aeschylus' Play Trilogy Titled OresteiaThe Homeric Attributes of Agamemnon in Aeschylus' Play Trilogy Titled Oresteia

The Homeric Attributes of Agamemnon in Aeschylus' Play Trilogy Titled Oresteia

Agamemnon: A Homeric Hero?

Agamemnon, the first take up in Aeschylus’ trilogy of tragedies entitled the Oresteia, tells the tale of Agamemnon, king of Argos, and the events that transpired following his go back from the Trojan Battle, most notably his gruesome death as a result of his wife Clytaemestra and her lover Aegisthus, Agamemnon’s cousin. Despite marked dissimilarities between Aeschylus’ portrayal of Agamemnon and Homer’s Agamemnon in the Iliad, incorporating his fate as the king and innovator of his people, Aeschylus’ Agamemnon possesses a number of Homeric qualities-at the trouble of his personal integrity as a hero. Apart from opening the take up in medias res and making make use of epithets to make reference to different characters, Aeschylus depicts a Homeric hero who in the end falls regardless of his heroic characteristics. A good example of this is nostos, the glorious homecoming. Following a long-awaited fall of Troy, Agamemnon’s return is definitely welcomed with joyous special event, yet a sense of dread and foreboding looms over the persons of Argos. Agamemnon’s success can be juxtaposed against the devastation wrought against Ilium and his heartless sacrifice of his child Iphigenia, implying that darker times nonetheless lay further ahead. In the same way, Agamemnon’s return is right away struck with worry about the purple cloth upon which Clytaemestra needs he walk to go into his palace, leaving him torn between his concern with aidos (shame and disgrace) and his dependence on kleos (veneration and glory), both which are essential qualities commonly observed within a Homeric hero. Finally, the revelation of his father Atreus’ legacy-having fed Thyestes, his brother and Aegisthus’ daddy, the flesh of his own

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